Your Hard Drive Is Going to Fail

August 3rd, 2017 by steve

If you’ve been around computers for a while, you know this equation all too well…

At least you should know that equation. Your hard drive is going to fail.

But evidently people don’t. Often, I hear of people who have important data on their computer, experience a hardware failure, and lose that data. Permanently.

They never learned that:

 

My heart goes out to people who, along with that data lose hours of hard work and years of treasured memories.

So why not backup your data? Now?

It’s not that hard.

You can use the cloud — Dropbox, Google Drive, MS OneDrive, to name a few. I do that.

Or you can create backups locally. I do that too.

I do this because I know my hard drive is going to fail.

Years ago, I spent $100 on a USB drive and plugged it into my router. (The router has to have a USB port). I hide this behind my monitor, so it’s not taking up valuable desk space.

Then I use it for local backups. Several times a week.

When I plugged the hard drive into the router, it showed up in Windows Explorer like this.

After entering the router username and password, I was able to copy files to that drive using Windows Explorer, or any OS equivalent.

Most frequently, I use something called FreeFileSync, an application that lets me synchronize two drives or folders to one another.

Be aware that, if you’re not careful, you can delete all your data with either of these tools, but if you do nothing, the certainty of Hard Drive Failure will cause data loss for sure.

Your hard drive is going to fail.

So what’s holding you back?

Did I mention that your hard drive is going to fail?

Take a look at your router now, and if it has the USB port, go buy a drive to backup your stuff. If you don’t have a router with a USB port, you can get one or you can use a USB port on your PC.

Do something, because your hard drive is going to fail.

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SOLVED: How to Reactivate OneDrive on Windows 10

March 3rd, 2017 by steve

For a long time, I didn’t use OneDrive. I had a pretty big Dropbox, so I saw no value in it. So I somehow deactivated it — so that it didn’t even appear in my system tray. It was as though it had been uninstalled. How could I reinstall it?

However, when I had a recent technical difficulty with Dropbox, and saw how slow their support was, I realized I should have a backup cloud system in place.

But it appeared that OneDrive wasn’t working on my Windows 10 machine. I wanted to reinstall it, but it turns out you can’t. It’s part of Windows 10, so there’s no install / uninstall option.

And running OneDrive from the Search Bar on Windows didn’t help.

Finally, I solved it.

OneDrive came up and asked for my credentials and let me choose where to install the OneDrive folder.

Solved!

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SOLVED: Windows 10 Breaks Lenovo Yoga Pro 2 Tablet & Tent Modes

February 11th, 2017 by steve

“My Lenovo Yoga doesn’t change its orientation or switch to tablet mode anymore! It stopped working like it used to! Windows broke it!” -Everybody

IF YOU’VE UPGRADED TO WINDOWS 10, the Lenovo Transition Application probably stopped working right. At best, Lenovo Transitions became glitchy, not changing the orientation when in the tablet mode or the tent mode. And when you closed the lid, it often didn’t wake up when reopened. So Lenovo Transitions was replaced with something called Lenovo Mode Control.

If you search around, you’ll find the new Mode Control Application from Lenovo. When you download and install the Mode Control Application, it will automatically remove the Transition Application.

However, when you install it, many users say the Mode Control Application causes their Yoga Pro 2 to slow down in the tent or tablet mode — so much so, that it becomes unusable.

This was my experience.

The solution is to open the Device Manager and update the DPTF drivers. DPTF stands for Dynamic Platform Thermal Framework.

It’s Intel’s way of keeping your unit from overheating, while allowing it to run as fast as possible.

I found these drivers under the System Devices Intel section on my unit.

Updating them relocated them within the Device Manager.

 

Just right-click each one and select update. Let it update from the internet.

Some users report that they had to update them twice. This was the case with one of the three on my system. It updated and then I rebooted and checked again, and it updated once more.

When I finished, it worked like a charm.

That got me to thinking, I wonder what other drivers need to be updated. So I went through my device manager, item by item, and probably made ten more updates.

If this helped you, the best way to say thanks is to share this post! THANKS!

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